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Arts

"Everyone Deserves A Home" portraits tell the stories of the formerly homeless

Date: 
Monday, March 26, 2018
Visitors are encouraged to describe what "home is" to them.

We’re honored to be hosting another exhibit that lifts up the voices and perspectives of those experiencing homelessness here in our city. The "Everyone Deserves a Home" project is currently on display in our second floor

gallery. This exhibit features portraits of formerly homeless individuals paired with text of participants’ personal stories. The subjects photographed have experienced homelessness and significant health issues prior to finding their current home in supportive housing communities operated by an organization called Delivering Innovation in Supportive Housing (DISH). Their origin stories here are laced with challenging themes – struggles with trauma, neglect, substance abuse and the corrosive effects of poverty and racism.

Lauren Hall founded DISH and is a true change maker in our city. Our eighth graders recently spent time with her engaged in service learning in the Tenderloin as part of their study on homelessness. I also had a chance to connect with Lauren to learn more about her work, this collection, and what we can do to make an impact.

Please explain who are you and what do you do.
My name is Lauren Hall and I am one of the leaders of an organization that believes “everyone deserves a home.” I started DISH with my colleague Doug Gary in September 2006. We wanted to create a property management organization that welcomed people home who were experiencing homelessness with a focus on health, well-being and community.

Why do you think this exhibit is important?
I recently had the opportunity to spend some time with students from SFFS at one of our buildings. We were sharing some of our takeaways from the afternoon and one young man talked about how his experience interacting with one of our tenants had given him greater insight into how he thought about people experiencing homelessness. His compassion and clarity was so striking to me. This exhibit gives people the opportunity to connect and consider the impacts of homelessness, and the importance of home. We want people to think about the way we have criminalized poverty, capitalized on racism and created a separate class of people in our country who deserve our respect and compassion.   

What do you want people to take away from this?
We want to offer alternate views into the lives of people who have experienced homelessness by providing their image as they want to portray themselves, and a brief part of their story. We hope ultimately that it fosters understanding, as well as the desire for action to address the systemic causes of homelessness such as our affordable housing, criminal justice and foster care systems. In this exhibit, we hope people see that homelessness is an experience that can happen to anyone and has more to do with communities impacted by poverty and trauma than individual challenges. Everyone deserves a home and it is on all of us to make that happen.

How can people get more involved in making an impact?
Vote and hold your representatives accountable! Support affordable and supportive housing in your neighborhood and on your ballot! Show up at community hearings for supportive housing and navigation centers and say YES IN MY NEIGHBORHOOD! Volunteer your skills or donate your funds to organizations working on solutions to homelessness so they can do more to address this crisis. Be kind to your neighbors who are forced to live on the street.

In addition to the photos, there is also a board nearby with the sentence starter, “Home is….” All are encouraged to share their thoughts and perspectives. You are also invited to a meet-and-greet with Lauren Hall on April 10 at 4:30pm. All are welcome! To learn more about DISH and how you can get involved, please visit dishsf.org

 

Listen to this year's third grade radio plays

Date: 
Thursday, March 1, 2018

At the end of last semester, drama teacher Jon Burnett helped a cohort of newly minted third grade voice actors produce their very own radio plays. Each of the 10 total shows, in just under two minutes, contains elements of action, horror, comedy, and the absurd. There’s even a historical drama!

“Discovering our voices” is the theme this year for the third grade drama class, and creating radio plays allowed students to make choices, figure out their theater voice, and create soundscapes. As a fun classroom exercise, students learned how to set the scene or create an environment using only their voices. In groups, students presented scenes like “a forest at midnight” or “downtown San Francisco during the day” and other groups had to guess what the environment was that they were listening to.

Students also worked hard on character voices, utilizing speed, pitch, tempo, volume—no small feat for third graders that just want to make drum sounds with their hands and feet.
For Jon, introducing radio plays in the third grade is a joyous endeavor because it is also something he discovered around that age. Growing up, Jon spent countless hours with his best friend Mark creating their own tape recorded radio shows. They kept it up until junior high.

“So much is visual today, so to focus on sounds is a unique experience,” says Jon. “It’s nice to say ‘cover your eyes or turn away, and just listen.’ But beyond that, many important 20th century playwrights grew up listening to radio and cite that in their development of story. So it is important to think about how words are used first to convey story.”

Jon notes that there was “some really nice creativity this year” with plays like “The Orchard Ghost,” a “cute, but very haunting” tale. “The Sacred Dungeon” is also a good use of voice with its creepy echo effects.

We hope you haven’t missed out on these very special radio plays, some of which lead with “Our story takes place at an office desk” and some with clever commercials like “Taco Burgers: only in New York!”

And you may never know “The Real Reason Why the HMS Titanic Sunk” unless you listen to the story below!
 

The Big Pencil Sharpener - Cooper, Henry, Margaret, Xochi

The Cursed Lollipop - Cassidy, Della, Leithian, Minjae, Theo

The Day the Sheriff Went Missing - Aman, Lea, Lucas, Nora, Selimah

Donkey Death - Kiran, Moses, Nathan, Ruby

The Fire Demon - Ava, Benji, Bram, Eliza

The Orchard Ghost - Francesca, Hazel, Jackson, Lev

The Real Reason Why the HMS Titanic Sunk - Cole, Lela, Marc, Mira, Oliver

The Sacred Dungeon - Bridger, Ryder, Tenley, Xavier

Train of Horror - August, Clay, Lucia, Lucy, Santi

Where Is the Hamster? - Juny, Maddy, Minyoung, Riley

 

Music teacher Jennifer Perfilio filling in for Kent this month

Date: 
Thursday, February 8, 2018
Jennifer Perfilio, music teacher. 

As part of our long-term commitment to the career of educators, Friends School provides an opportunity to apply for what we call our "mini-sabbatical" program. The mini-

sabbatical offers a teacher a short time away to pursue an area of professional inspiration, and to research and practice outside of the footprint of the regular school day.

As many of you may have heard from your children, music teacher Kent Jue is the recipient of a mini-sabbatical this year, and he is currently off on deep dive into choral music for the next three weeks.

Our long time performing arts substitute teacher (and also an SFFS parent), Jennifer Perfilio, will be stepping in during this time to cover Kent's classes. She and Kent have collaborated and planned together, and Jennifer is now serving as a "professional guest teacher," delivering some of the same aspects of Kent's music program in K-8, but also offering a unique experience during this period, focusing on choral movement. Kent returns after February break, on March 2nd. Friends School thanks you, Jennifer!

The Art of Dede Tisone Featured in Arts@SFFS Gallery Space

Date: 
Tuesday, February 6, 2018
8th graders hold M4W to reflect on the Dede’s art and impact.

A few years ago, as part of their study on homelessness, our eighth graders read an article in the Chronicle about Dede Tisone. Overwhelmed by the homelessness crisis here in our city,

Dede decided to use her art as a way to raise awareness and inspire positive action. We invited Dede to speak to our eighth graders about her work. It was powerful for them to hear her passion and purpose. From this, we wondered if we would be able to share her artwork with our school community.

This curiosity has turned into reality. Caren Andrews, who along with Jennifer Stuart, curate our second floor community art space, and have coordinated with Dede to display her work for the next several weeks. While installing her artwork in our second floor gallery space, we asked Dede what she feels is important about her work. She said, “It is my intention to have the art viewing audience take a close look at what we avoid looking at on the streets of San Francisco. By elevating what we find uncomfortable, I hope to raise awareness while raising funds for a cause I care deeply about.”

Dede’s work is for sale with all proceeds going to Food Runners, an organization that picks up leftover or extra food from businesses, churches, non-profits, etc. and delivers them to shelters or pantries serving those experiencing homelessness. Additionally, Dede’s art is a teaching tool for our students. This exhibit is an example of how art, social justice, and action intertwine and intersect. Dede’s artwork shines a light on injustice and empowers others to make a difference.

Please take the time to come into school to visit this exhibit in our second floor gallery.