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Mysteries of the Unseen World: Thinking Like an Artist/Scientist

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

“The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and science. So the unknown, the mysterious is where art and science meet.”
~Albert Einstein
 

In mid-march, we attended the National Art Educators Association (NAEA) conference hosted in Seattle, WA. This is the ninth year that we attended, and the third time that we co-presented at the conference, which has been an amazing opportunity not just to share the unique approach to the arts at SFFS with independent schools from across the country, but to gain inspiration from other visual art instructors as well. While at the conference, we celebrated ten years of collaborative work at SFFS by presenting a hands-on workshop that illuminates how the visual arts and scientific inquiry are intertwined by sharing two interdisciplinary units—one third grade, the other seventh and eighth grade.

Integration is a natural way in which we experience the world. True integration in the classroom serves all of the disciplines involved and makes connections to ‘real life’ experience outside of the walls of our school. As in our classroom/studios, participants in our (sold out) workshop were introduced to a series of artmaking routines to investigate a question that is relevant to both scientists and artists. Those attending the workshop came away with a clearer sense of how this approach builds understanding in both disciplines while providing experiences that invigorate a spirit of inquiry, connecting to the real world of artists and scientists.

Here is a small sample of the brilliant student work that we showcased at the conference:

Three examples from the third grade of a two-minute warm up drawing.
The prompt: Draw yourself as an artist/scientist.

 

Seventh/eighth grade art inspired by the Hubble Telescope images.
Students used embroidery in order to focus on line, shape, and patterns. 

 

More seventh/eighth grade art inspired by the Hubble Telescope.

 

Third grade computer virus drawings. Prompts: What is the story of our computer virus?
What kind of computer virus will we craft? 



 
A closer look at third grade computer virus drawings.

 

A closer look at third grade computer virus sculptures.